Office of Development

Addressing race as a public health crisis, rankings, back-to-school webinar, and COVID-19 update

Email sent on August 3, 2020

 

Dear Friends of Michigan Medicine,

Speaking up for solidarity

Michigan Medicine, like other institutions, must determine within our own culture how we will recognize and respond to racism as a public health crisis. We want our communities, whether physically close or across the country, to stand together as leaders against inequality. We are committed to creating fundamental change that leads to a culture of anti-racism and justice and inclusiveness for people of all colors.

A fundamental part of this is becoming educated and informed, so we can become more vocal about why people of color in America remain negatively and disproportionately impacted by violence, health care disparities, and social injustice. We must understand the complexities of these issues in order to eliminate them.

I invite you to stand with the Michigan Medicine community and speak up for solidarity and proactive anti-racism. I shared some thoughts in a recent blog post, and also want to share with you some additional resources and anti-racism support and tools that may be helpful for us to shape the ongoing dialogue on racism.

 

U.S. News rankings

I am very pleased to share with you that Michigan Medicine was once again ranked among the top hospitals in the country by U.S. News & World Report. Our adult hospitals are No. 1 in Michigan and No. 11 in the nation in the annual ranking. Michigan Medicine had 13 specialties ranked in the top 50, and five specialties ranked in the nation’s top 10: diabetes/endocrinology; gastroenterology/GI surgery; ophthalmology; pulmonology; and urology. Earlier this year, C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital was ranked the top children’s hospital in Michigan in all 10 specialties evaluated, and Mott was among just 24 hospitals ranked in all 10 evaluated specialties. In a first-time ranking by Newsweek earlier this summer, Michigan Medicine was No. 5 in the nation and No. 15 in the world on the magazine’s 2020 World’s Best Hospitals list. These rankings are an indication of the commitment of our physicians, nurses, and all of our staff. On behalf of our entire organization, I want to express my sincere thanks to all those who provide such extraordinary care to our patients, and to supporters like you who make this work possible.

 

Back-to-school webinar

I invite you to join the latest webinar in our Well Aware series, this one focusing on back-to-school concerns and challenges. Our experts will address questions about returning to college, including what will be different at the U-M Medical School this fall. They will discuss classroom settings, virtual learning, and much more during this Zoom webinar at 1 p.m. Thursday, August 13. Learn more and RSVP.

 

COVID-19 update

As I’m sure you are aware, COVID-19 cases are increasing dramatically on a national level. Fortunately, at Michigan Medicine, our numbers remain low. We had 10 to 15 COVID-19-positive patients in our hospital on any given day recently, much lower than the peak of 229 in mid-April. We remain vigilant, and I assure you that we are doing everything we can to not only treat these patients but also to keep our other patients safe. We continue to offer many surgeries and procedures, as well as clinic visits. I encourage you to see if in-person or video appointments may be available for your medical needs. It is always important, but never more so than during a global pandemic, to ensure that your health care needs are being met.

As always, thank you for your continued support of our COVID-19 Philanthropic Fund and Employee Emergency Need Fund. We’ve also established a new COVID-19 Research Fund and two Emergency Student Aid Funds. You can learn more about these funds and make donations on this page.

 

With kind regards, 

Marschall S. Runge, M.D., Ph.D.
Dean, University of Michigan Medical School
Executive Vice President for Medical Affairs, U-M
CEO, Michigan Medicine